Member Brief: Facebook Commerce Goes Physical

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The three most influential platforms for American eCommerce operators are Facebook, Google, and Amazon. Depending on who you ask, each of the three could be considered the most important platform for brands. Google and Facebook’s advertising systems have been the foundation for brands pursuing direct to consumer models. Whereas Amazon, has been the foundation for the brands that are pursuing distribution.

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Member Brief No. 17: The Conde Nast Report

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Conde Nast recently released a summary of a report on the media group’s power to influence purchases. The study was conducted in partnership with an organization called Tapestry. In it, the findings identified the significance of brand recognition and trust in top funnel purchasing decisions. Conducted throughout the spring of 2018 using Tapestry’s CDJ technique, Conde Nast measured the responses of 4,500 American consumers between the ages of 18 and 64.

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Member Brief No. 8: NYT Commerce Report

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The word commerce was a dirty one in the media space, until recently. One of 2PM’s capstone beliefs is that commerce is the central engine of the digital economy. That may seem to be a reasonable now. But consider that just two years ago, fewer than ten digital publishers maintained direct to consumer storefronts. Many will point to Jackthreads and Thrillist, so here is the clipping from May 2010 for reference:

Thrillist has acquired Gilt Groupe-for-dudes site JackThreads. The deal moves Thrillist, the NYC-based email-newsletter-for-dudes startup, into the e-commerce market. Previously, Thrillist has generated revenue through ads and sponsorships in its emails and on its website.

Spooked by the perceived failures of the Jackthreads x Thrillist partnership, content and commerce was dead on arrival as a revenue strategy for quite some time. But if you dug into the venture’s number, Jason Ross’s eCommerce company did quite well after being absorbed by Thrillist.

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